Porta-Casa

If I can’t be on a train, I want to be in a tent.

Camping out with the troop. The youth leaders have got their patrols to sleep, held their quick meeting to plan the next day and turned in for the night. It’s 10pm and totally quiet in the camp. I change my socks, tuck into the bag, zip up, set my alarm for 6:30, put my shoes by the tent door, prop up on my extra sleeping bag, and turn on my Kindle.

A long day, a full belly, a quiet forest, and a warm sleeping bag conspire to shorten my time catching up with Fyodor Dostoevsky, and I’ll be snoring in a few minutes.

 

Back to (Scouter) school

Spending the day at University of Scouting, taking five classes and teaching one.

The one thing most people don’t realize about scouting is how much we invest in training, training ourselves and others. Starting with Youth Protection Training all the way to the pinnacle, Wood Badge, for every hour I spend leading my troop, I spend an hour training, being trained, or preparing to train. This is all in addition to the time spent planning, fundraising, and preparing for activities.

I wouldn’t have it any other way. If we are to provide our youth with the development and guidance they and their families expect com this program, every leader needs to be a student.