The view out my virtual office window this morning.

Courtesy of the wonderful people at VirtualRailfan, this is what I am looking at outside my “office window” this morning: fresh snowfall on the tracks in La Plata, Missouri. Almost a postcard view.

Advertisements

Administrative Note: Going Anti-Social

With due respect to my fellow tribesman and hapa-daddy Mark Zuckerberg, I have reached some conclusions about Facebook after nearly a decade of use.

  1. Facebook was once a magnificent means of staying in touch with friends
  2. It has, of late, become a tool of hucksters, social manipulators, propagandists, disinformation artists, and very, very angry people to a far greater degree than it remains a connective medium.
  3. It became for me, as a result, a giant black hole into which my time and attention was sucked, never to be seen again.
  4. What was worse, any content that I created was used by Facebook to make money.

As a result, I have downloaded my content, deleted my presence, and will have no more to do with the platform. I’m done, and this time for good.

This blog is now my feed. I would rather pay the nice folks at Automattic a modest fee every year to own my platform and hold it separate from the anger, noise, and manipulation of Facebook. Better to shout in the wilderness than whisper in a crowd.

The sole reason I post this is to provide you a heads-up that I will be gradually back-filling content from my Facebook feed into earlier sections of this blog, so if you see something anachronistic, it is just me saving the worthwhile tidbits from my years on Facebook.

NB: Twitter is on probation at the moment, as is WeChat.

Naturally, feel free to comment.

Calming the Sky-Chicken

I have flown well over a million miles in my life, but I am still an incurable white-knuckle flyer. When you combine that with the challenges posed by my two-meter height, air travel for me is a battle: first to get myself into a seat that isn’t excruciatingly painful to sit in, and then to cope with a constant state of incipient terror.

I cure the first by shelling out something like 10% of my take-home income for upgrades. The second condition, the fear, is like any other chronic ailment: it can be managed but never cured.

One way I manage the fear is through knowledge. I have studied aviation, weather, and spoken to countless pilots and flight crew members. I have learned enough about airlines to choose those with the best operational safety, and watch for the subtle signals that things may be on the decline. Before every flight I consult a half-dozen apps and websites that tell me what to expect. And during the flight I switch my inflight entertainment system to the “flight information” screen, and leave it there for the duration.

So you can imagine why I was so delighted, when I boarded an ANA 787-900 for a flight from Singapore to Tokyo, to discover a screen that was essentially a simplified version of the pilot’s heads-up display. Altitude, airspeed, position, direction, winds, and other flight information are portrayed against a forward -looking moving map that offers everything but air traffic and weather.

Genius.

It will not surprise you to hear that this hop was probably one of my most calm and comfortable flights ever.

Some people will never worry in an airplane: my father was one. But I have friends and colleagues that need to be chemically calmed before getting on a plane. I have no immediate remedies to offer. For me, the medicine lies in the effort to make ever more believable the comforting illusion of control.

Waiting for Swallows and Trains

Virtually working from a perch atop the train station at San Juan Capistrano this morning. A late spring rainstorm is passing through, the hills are a bright green, and there is ranchera music in the air. The town feels a little sleepy, and it leaves me kind of wishing that it was a Friday before a lazy weekend.

Lazy weekends are a bit of a fiction for me lately. During my workout yesterday I caught myself singing along to Huey Lewis & the News’s underrated “Couple Days Off” in a really loud voice. I’m hoping for a smooth flight tomorrow: I could use the sleep.

On that subject, this post marks the beginning of about six weeks of interesting workplaces, both real and virtual. I will share in real time as bandwidth permits.

Cold Kentucky Morning

Virtually working from the second floor of 111 West Main Street in La Grange, Kentucky today. It’s 25F, windy, and very light snow.

The sounds of the traffic are comforting, and CSX manages to send a train right down the middle of Main Street every hour or so.

It’s a small town, but only an adrenalin junkie would dare call this place “boring.”