Snow. April. Nordhoff Ridge.

Took this at 0700. Gone from all but the North slopes after a few hours, but still: Climate change FTW.

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The Great Dune from Above

We hiked up the Outlook Trail to find ourselves perched on a rise between the canyon and the sea, looking down upon the big sand dune that hugs the hillside above Pacific Coast Highway at Thornhill Broome Beach.

I have climbed the dune often and have passed it more than a hundred times, but I have never seen it from this vantage. From here the dune is no longer dominant: you see it in context, a beach blown uphill at a point in the coast that is exposed to the prevailing northwesterly onshore wind. From here south Point Conception no longer blocks those winds, but only here does the rock face cup just enough to capture the sand and spray.

The view reminds me of my desire to study both geography and geology when I return to the classroom a few years hence. My travels and a lifetime studying politics and commerce have left me more curious than ever about the planet upon which we play out our temporal dramas.

Snowy Sunset

Hunkering down for Friday night in my warm hotel room at the Newark Airport Marriott. The lower Manhattan skyline makes up part of the background in my view of this deeply frozen landscape.

The airport is filled with people trying to get out of town in the wake of the storm the blew through here Thursday. Me, I’m exhausted, and I’m going to have a quiet evening and a good night’s sleep, a lazy day tomorrow, then crawl into my seat on a flight home to the West Coast at 10pm tomorrow night.

The first week of the year has been crazy, and I expect the next few weeks to be little different. My current hope: that February will be the slowes, quietest month for the past year (because of Chinese New Year on the 16th) and I’ll be able to get some meaningful work done.