Cali-Twisted B-on-T

I don’t eat beans-on-toast anymore, but I thought I would try this California version: low-sodium black beans on a whole grain bagel flat. Still around 500 calories, but more filling, no sugar, and a bunch more fiber. It’s a cheat, but a small and satisfying one.

Early Rat

Warming up on the calf-raises at 6:30am. Started a year ago at 35 lbs, up to 85 lbs.

Why the locomotive on my workout clothes? Because it’s my train-ing shirt, of course!

#traingeek #foamer #ferroequinologist

Looking Like My Parents

I had to laugh at and share this shot, because in it I look like I textbook combination of my parents.

While this provides some assurance that my family tree is as advertised, it is also a bit frightening: I look like my parents did when I was a teenager.

Ah, well: aging beats the alternative.

President’s Day Tech Reading

One of the best parts of my work life is deep-diving into the industries, issues, and ideas that touch on my clients. Now that I am back working with the most innovative company in the telecommunications business, topical reading is at least half of my list.

My daily client contact just finished Brad Smith and Carole Ann Browne’s Tools and Weapons, so I am nearly done with it. Smith shares his thoughts on the double-edged nature of the innovations that are pushing into our lives – a critical mental warm-up as we guide our client through the rollout of 5G wireless networks.

Jon Gertner’s The Idea Factory has been perched on my shelf for years waiting for its moment, and that moment is now. I see a lot of interesting parallels and contrasts between my client – who has spent $60 billion on R&D in the past three decades – and Bell Labs, all good. Bell Labs, like Xerox PARC after it, made some profound mistakes in its efforts, most notably spending vast sums on R&D without building the business and legal structures to capture the value of all of that investment. That’s my superficial understanding: hopefully, Gertner will offer some important nuance.

Wrapping these – and catching up on back numbers of The Economist – should round out my long weekend.

Twelve Miles Uphill, Before and After

Sunny dropped us at the beach at Sycamore Canyon around 9am. It was a later start than we would normally like, but as it turns out it was a good thing we were rested.

The twelve mile uphill hike wasn’t particularly strenuous, except for a portion where we gained about 600 feet in a mile, and that was only a challenge because it was after 8 miles and 2:40 of steady walking up slope without rest. What is more, Aaron keeps up a steady 3mph pace with a full day pack, so it was a bit more than a leisurely stroll up Sycamore Canyon.

In theory the last four miles should have been an easy downhill stroll to the 101, but fatigue was starting to set in, and even the kid was audibly relieved when our stopping point hive into view as we crossed the freeway.

By the end we had taken a bit over 4 hours to walk the 12 miles, but we had crossed the Santa Monica Mountains, burned 2,000 extra calories, and started our training program for the big prize: the John Muir Trail.